Blog

Now that Britney is Free, We Should Take a Hard Look at Systems that Deprive People with Disabilities of Their Freedom

By: Jalyn Radziminski

After following the #FreeBritney movement all summer, we heard the news that “Britney was finally free” from the control of her father through a conservatorship. It is now time to take stock of the larger picture of often abusive and unjustified control over people with disabilities through systems of conservatorship, guardianships, involuntary institutionalization, and forced medication. In order to make lasting change, the voices of people directly impacted must be valued and heard.
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On this ADA Anniversary, Congress Should Pass the Better Care Better Jobs Act

By: Jennifer Mathis

During this anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), disability advocates call on Congress to pass the Better Care Better Jobs Act, which would make a greater federal investment in Medicaid home and community-based services (HCBS) for people with disabilities. This legislation would bring a much-needed expansion of HCBS by authorizing a 10% increase in federal Medicaid reimbursement for these services.
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Likely Broad Impact for U.S. Department of Justice Finding on Incarceration of People with Mental Illness

By: Ira Burnim

A pivotal moment has come in the long and complex effort to reform the U.S. criminal justice system. The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has directed officials in Alameda County, California, to fundamentally change the way it deals with people with mental illness.
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Bazelon Center’s History and the Impact of the ADA

By: Jalyn Radziminski & Sadie Salazar

“Let the shameful wall of exclusion finally come tumbling down,” declared President George H. W. Bush as he signed the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) into law on July 26, 1990. July 26, 2021 marks the 31st anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the world’s first comprehensive declaration of equality for people with disabilities. When the civil rights legislation was passed in 1990, it had overwhelming bipartisan support.
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