In Congress Archive

In Congress Archive > 112th Congress

Stop Child Abuse in Residential Programs for Teens Act of 2011 (H.R. 3126 / S. 1667)

  • Sponsors: Representative George Miller (D-CA) and Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA). 
  • Summary: The Stop Child Abuse in Residential Programs for Teens Act was introduced on October 6, 2011. The bill establishes standards to prevent child abuse and neglect in private and public residential programs such as boot camps, therapeutic schools and wilderness programs, that serve children with emotional, behavioral, mental health or addiction challenges. The bill also creates mechanisms for monitoring and enforcement of such facilities and provides grants to states for the prevention of child abuse and neglect and for the treatment of children’s mental health or substance-use conditions. 
  • Committee: House Education and Workforce Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education; Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions 
  • Bill Text: H.R. 3126S. 1667 | Support Letter | Fact Sheet  | Press Release | House Bill Tracker |Senate Bill Tracker

Ending Corporal Punishment in Schools Act of 2011 (H.R. 3027)

  • Sponsor: Representative Carolyn McCarthy (D-NY)
  • Summary: The Ending Corporal Punishment in Schools Act was introduced on September 22, 2011. The legislation prohibits the Secretary of Education from providing funding to any educational agency or institution that allows school personnel to inflict corporal punishment upon a student to punish or modify behavior. It also requires each state to periodically submit a plan to the Secretary that describes how the state eliminates the use of corporal punishment in schools and the communication tools it utilizes concerning parents and personnel for this purpose. Additionally, the Secretary is authorized to award grants and subgrants to improve school climate and culture via positive behavior supports. A variety of assessments and monitoring provisions are also authorized.
  • Committee: House Education and Workforce Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education
  • Bill Text: Bill Text | Press Release | Bill Tracker

Keeping All Students Safe Act (H.R. 1381 / S. 2020)

  • Sponsor: Representative George Miller (D-CA) and Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA)
  • Summary: The Keeping All Students Safe Act was introduced on April 6, 2011, in the House and on December 16, 2011, in the Senate. The bill would protect students from the harmful practices of restraint and seclusion by prohibiting its use unless the student’s behavior poses an immediate danger of physical injury and least restrictive interventions would be ineffective. Among other notable safeguards, the legislation also requires appropriate training for school personnel, notification to parents after restraint and seclusion is used, and encourages the adoption of school-wide positive behavior interventions and supports (PBIS) as an alternative approach to address students’ challenging behavior.
  • Committee:  House Education and the Workforce Subcommittee on Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education; Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee
  • Bill Text: H.R. 1381: Bill Text | Bazelon Center Support Letter | APPRAIS Fact Sheet | Coalition Support Letter | TASH Report: The Cost of Waiting | Bill Tracker S. 2020: Bill Summary | Press Release | APPRAIS Support Letter | Bill Tracker

Positive Behavior for Safe and Effective Schools Act (H.R. 3165) 

  • Sponsors: Sponsors: Representative Danny Davis (D-IL), Chris Murphy (D-CT), Todd Platts (R-PA) and Bobby Scott (D-VA).
  • Summary: The Positive Behavior for Safe and Effective Schools Act was introduced on October 12, 2011. The bill amends the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) to encourage the use of school-wide positive behavior support (SWPBS) to improve school climate and foster students’ academic and social success. The legislation expressly allows state education agencies to use Title I funds to support the implementation of SWPBS and promotes professional development to help teachers implement SWPBS and better understand the social and emotional learning of children. Additionally, the bill expands Title IV of ESEA, regarding Safe and Drug Free Schools and Communities, to include support for programs such as SWPBS.
  • Committee: House Education and Workforce Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education.
  • Bill Text: Bill Text | Bill Tracker

Achievement through Prevention Act (S. 541)

  • Sponsors: Senators Michael Bennet (D-CO), Lamar Alexander (R-TN), Al Franken (D-MN) and Richard Burr (R-NC)
  • Summary: The Achievement through Prevention Act was introduced on March 10, 2011. The bill would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) to increase implementation of school-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS), and early intervention services (EIS). The goals would be to improve student academic achievement, reduce over-identification of individuals with disabilities, and reduce disciplinary problems. Support and training from the State Education Agency would result in the development, implementation, and coordination of comprehensive PBIS aligned with services provided under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The legislation would also improve coordination between special educators and general educators by effectively aligning IDEA and ESEA, to enhance academic and behavioral outcomes for all students.
  • Committee: Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee
    Bill Text | Support Letter | Bill Tracker

Mental Health in Schools Act (H.R. 2531)

  • Sponsor: Representative Grace Napolitano (D-CA)
  • Summary: The legislation increases funding for the Safe Schools- Healthy Students program to enable states to expand school-based mental health services for children in grades kindergarten through 12. It allows for a flexible, state-based approach to creating a comprehensive mental health school-program and promotes formal collaboration between families, schools, welfare agencies, and substance abuse and mental health service systems. It also encourages schools to implement positive behavior supports into their school curriculum.
  • Thomas: House
  • Committee: House Energy and Commerce
  • Supporting Documents: IOM Report, Press Release

Successful, Safe and Healthy Students Act (S. 919)

  • Sponsor: Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA)
  • Summary: The Successful, Safe and Healthy Students Act of 2011 was introduced on May 9, 2011. The legislation would assist states in developing and implementing comprehensive programs and strategies to foster a positive environment in which students can thrive academically, socially, physically and mentally. Programs that promote mental health and expand counseling and mental health services to all students would be in place to enhance access, including prevention, intervention, appropriate diagnosis and referral services. Additionally, collaboration between the school and community agencies would be improved through communication, technical assistance, and training of school personnel and mental health professionals. The legislation would work towards recommended student-to-professional ratios for school counselors, social workers, and psychologists, in order to make sure that the counseling, social, emotional, behavioral, mental health, and educational needs of all students are met.
  • Committee: Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee
  • Bill Text: Bill Text | Support Letter | Bill Tracker

Mental Health in Schools Act of 2011 (H.R. 751)

  • Sponsor: Representative Grace F. Napolitano (D-CA)
  • Summary: The Mental Health in Schools Act of 2011 was introduced on February 17, 2011. The bill would expand school-based mental health services for children in grades kindergarten through 12. It allows for a flexible, state-based approach to creating a comprehensive mental health school program and promotes formal collaboration between families, schools, welfare agencies, and substance use and mental health service systems. The bill also encourages schools to incorporate positive behavior supports into their school curriculum.
  • Committee:  House Energy and Commerce Committee
  • Bill Text: Bill Text | Support Letter  | Press Release | Bill Tracker

 IDEA Fairness Restoration Act (S. 613 / H.R. 1208)

  • Sponsors: Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) and Congressman Chris Van Hollen (D-MD)
  • Summary: The IDEA Fairness Restoration Act was introduced on March 17, 2011. The bill would level the playing field for families of children with special needs, for whom due process is their only hope for achieving an appropriate education for their child. It does so by amending the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) to permit a prevailing party in an action or proceeding to be able to include the fees of expert witnesses (such as psychologists, physicians, educational experts, therapists) and necessary tests and evaluations in their recovery.
  • Committee: Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee; House Education and the Workforce Committee
  • Bill Text: S. 613H.R. 1208 | Support Letter | House Bill Tracker | Senate Bill Tracker

Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Act Reauthorization of 2011 (S. 740)

  • Sponsor: Senator Jack Reed (D-RI)
  • Summary: The Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Act Reauthorization of 2011 was introduced on April 6, 2011. The bill would renew and expand provisions under the Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Act with the goal of increasing suicide prevention programs in communities and college campuses across the country. The bill also promotes the development of effective strategies and best practices related to youth suicide prevention.
  • Committee: Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee
  • Bill Text: Bill Text | Support Letter | Bill Tracker

Student Non-Discrimination Act (S. 555 / H.R. 998)

  • Sponsors: Senator Al Franken (D-MN) and Congressman Jared Polis (D-CO)
  • Summary: The Student Non-Discrimination Act was introduced on March 10, 2011. The bill would establish a comprehensive federal prohibition against discrimination in public schools based on actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity. It would give LGBT students similar civil rights protections against bullying and harassment as those that currently exist based on race and gender. The goal is to ensure a safe learning environment, free of harassment, bullying, intimidation and violence.
  • Committee: Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee; House Education and Workforce Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education
  • Bill Text: S. 555H.R. 998 | Support Letter | Fact Sheet | House Bill Tracker Senate Bill Tracker

Mental Health on Campus Improvement Act (H.R 1833)

  • Sponsor: Representative Janice D. Schakowsky (D-IL)
  • Summary: The Mental Health on Campus Improvement Act was introduced on May 11, 2011. The bill would assist colleges and universities in successfully attending to the growing mental health needs in colleges and universities by improving access to mental and behavioral health services on college campuses. The legislation would establish grants to eligible colleges and universities to foster a comprehensive approach to campus behavioral health issues, including developing and disseminating best practices and expanding campus mental health services and mental health training.
  • Committees: House Energy and Commerce Committee; House Education and the Workforce Committee
  • Bill Text: Bill Text | Support Letter | Bill Tracker

Children’s Mental Health Accessibility Act (S. 3289) 

  • Sponsors: Senators John Kerry (D-MA) and Charles Grassley (R-IA). 
  • Summary: The Children’s Mental Health Accessibility Act was introduced on June 13, 2012. The bill expands the Medicaid home and community-based services waiver (1915c of the Social Security Act) to include youth in or at risk of placement in an institution called a psychiatric residential treatment facility (PRTF).  Currently, Medicaid home and community-based services waivers are available only for people who need the level of care provided in a hospital, nursing facility or intermediate care facility for the “mentally retarded.” Current law does not allow states to offer home and community-based waiver services as an alternative to a PRTF. However, many children with serious mental health disorders are at risk of placement in a PRTF, not a hospital. The legislation would also eliminate the outdated term “mentally retarded” as it is referenced in the Medicaid waiver statute, and replace it with “intellectually disabled.”
  • Committee: Senate Finance Committee
  • Bill Text: Bill Text | Dear Colleague Letter | Support Letter | Bill Tracker

Positive Aging Act (S. 525)

  • Sponsor: Senator Susan M. Collins (R-ME)
  • Summary: The Positive Aging Act was introduced on March 9, 2011. The bill supports stronger integration between mental health services and primary care for older adults. The legislation would improve coordination between trained and certified mental health and primary care professionals in the areas of screening, assessments and prevention. Additionally, it would help foster research and the development of evidence-based practice models for older adults.
  • Committee: Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee

Health Information Technology Act of 2011 (S. 539)

  • Sponsor: Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI)
  • Summary: The Health Information Technology Act of 2011 was introduced on March 10, 2011. The bill would extend health information technology assistance eligibility (under the meaningful use incentives established through HITECH Act) to mental health and substance use professionals and facilities, including community mental health centers and psychiatric hospitals. The bill is intended to achieve widespread adoption of health information technology in order to help save lives through improved coordination of care.
  • Committee: Senate Finance Committee
  • Bill Text: Bill Text | Support Letter | Bill Tracker

Recidivism Reduction Act (H.R. 6256)

  • Sponsors: Representatives Andre Carson (D-IN) and Pete Stark (D-CA)
  • Summary: The Recidivism Reduction Act was reintroduced on August 1, 2012. The legislation would provide timely restoration of federal disability benefits (SSI, SSDI and Medicaid) to eligible individuals upon release from incarceration. Its goal is to ease offenders’ transition back into society, especially for those who have mentally illnesses. Prompt access to disability and medical benefits upon release is essential for access to needed treatment, housing and other critical services and support that can help prevent the cycle of recidivism.
  • Committee: House Energy and Commerce Committee and House Ways and Means Committee
  • Bill Text: Bill Text | Bill Tracker | Supporting Publication: Lifelines: Linking to Federal Benefits for People Exiting Corrections

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